This week… tigers, skulls and a Del Boy moment

Temperatures have dropped in the UK this week and after what seemed like endless days of autumn sunshine we now have heavy rain. From now until around March bracing country walks, warming hot soups and evenings on the sofa watching great classic films are the general rule, including an annual rerun of Le Carré’s Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (BBC, 1979) with the much-missed Alec Guinness.

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This week… chimney tops, ration books and guardian angels

Every September heritage houses, museums and other buildings throw open their doors to the public. Entry and tours are free despite the work of many of these organisations being independently funded, so a donation is welcome. The nationwide Heritage Open Days festival closes today and I took the opportunity take a peek behind the scenes over the nine-day event in Winchester. Here’s what I discovered.

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Gallery and Museum Reopenings: Summer’s Top Exhibitions

This week the government announced plans to cut funding for arts education by as much as 50%. Ironically, this month museums and galleries (and other indoor venues) will be able to reopen from lockdown. I’m keen to support as many as art venues as possible but there’s no room here to include every one, so from an inbox choc-full of press releases on new exhibitions and events here’s my top openings in May.

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Review: High Gloss

Over his career Pop Art artist, Heiner Meyer, has captured the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century consumer culture through images of cinema, fashion, TV, luxury cars and elite sports. Meyer’s sculptures and paintings often focus on the feminine beauty culture, employing bright colors his work often satirises well-known and celebrity subjects.

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